Pensive Tuesdays, read with caution.

sven-wilhelm-359306

Every so often, I am overwhelmed with the insurmountable feeling that I’m wasting my life. I think it’s when I have too much time (not wine), and start researching things like ‘how much plastic is there in the ocean‘ and ‘what will the world be like in 20 years time.’ There seems no easy way to make a difference, we’re just on this downwards spiral to destroying our planet and only Mother Nature can really save us. Depressing thoughts, easily remedied with a large dose of ignorance and a run up a steep hill, there’s nothing like gasping for breath to make you forget your woes. But it’s still there, if a little deeper beneath the surface, a sort of hatred for man kind and our destruction, greed and thirst for power.

Of course veganism seems to be the fashionable answer to saving the world, but I don’t want to live on a farm free planet where fields of methane releasing cattle are replaced by blocks of boring flats and boring people. America is a different story, they wouldn’t have such a problem if they weren’t trying to farm cattle on what is essentially a desert and then there’s the demand for cheap meat, when will people wake up and realise that mankind is the real problem.

And then there’s wine. Glorious, glorious wine. No matter how much space we need for housing, data centres or greenhouses, Bordeaux will always remain Bordeaux and in case you didn’t know green warriors, irrigation is illegal in Bordeaux, vines are basically saving the planet, turn the world into vines.

China too are embracing the wine culture in new spirit. I recently read a fascinating blog by a chap called Alex Xu who has, after many many years of planning, planted his vineyard in just seven days. Alex said on the current wine industry in China:

“My impression is that owners and winemakers have no faith in the Chinese consumer. Instead of striving for a quality driven product, they are afraid of failure, and instead opt to make a wine that won’t offend nor excite. They are imprisoned by the idea that the Chinese consumer can only accept certain tastes or profiles of wine (on which tastes they can’t even agree), and in turn make wine to fit those ideas. To me, that seems a horrible way to create a product, passively taking orders rather than actively trying to challenge, shape tastes and create change. I’m not surprised though — many winery owners in China don’t drink or care for wine at all.”

Aren’t those beautiful words? You can read the whole blog here, the passion and drive is truly a joy to read as well as being ridiculously interesting.

Another thrilling article I’ve read recently was from The National Geographic on the produce industry of Holland, we’re so far behind in this country although I don’t think it’s so necessary here yet, but everyone else could do with catching up. You can read the article here titled This Tiny Country Feeds The World.

What I took from this article is how we’re just not making enough out of the space we’re given. There are business blocks in Holland where they’re literally growing tomatoes and all sorts of other vegetables in a greenhouse on the roof, which purifies water for the fish underneath, that the local restaurateurs then use in their kitchens. No wonder dutch people are so tall and beautiful, they’re not eating crap.

So there you have it, my somewhat depressing thoughts on a Tuesday evening. And what am I drinking? It’s a gift from my Spanish housemate George who has since departed, my house, he hasn’t died. Curiously, there is another bottle IN THE FRIDGE, the bloody fridge, the first red wine I have ever met in a fridge, I certainly didn’t leave it in there.

Vina Albali Gran Seleccion Tempranillo DO Valdepenas

You can buy a whole case of this wine on Amazon for a mere £27.00 and it’s on prime so it will arrive the next day, splendid. If you hadn’t guessed it’s Spanish, it is a nice solid 13.5% and says it’s been aged for 3 months in American oak barrels.

It’s a great wine to have to hand, it’s exceedingly well-balanced, fruity and has a good grip. The price alongside the pleasing taste means you can get it out, guilt free, any day of the week. Cheers to Tuesday…

Thank you to Unsplash for the free photo!

 

6 thoughts on “Pensive Tuesdays, read with caution.

  1. Thank you for the kind words, and for sharing my post. 100% agree, if there’s anything that might save our world, wine is probably our best bet. Beyond a scarce amount of water in the first two years to make sure the young vines don’t die, I plan on totally dry farming as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for the kind words, and for sharing my post. 100% agree, if there’s anything that might save our world, wine is probably our best bet. Beyond a scarce amount of water in the first two years to make sure the young vines don’t die, I plan on totally dry farming as well.

    Like

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